Transport solutions of the future

Jean-Pierre Farandou: "This Observatory will let us offer the mobility services of tomorrow"
Jean-Pierre Farandou, Chairman of Keolis, explains how the partnership with Netexplo will enable the Group to move up to a new level in listening to users and understanding their needs thanks to digital technologies.

At Keolis we have been studying user behavior for a long time so as to understand their needs and expectations. It's part of our DNA.

 

Jean-Pierre Farandou, Président du Groupe Keolis - during the presentation of the Keolis-Netexplo Digital Mobility Observatory.

Why has Keolis joined forces with Netexplo to launch this Digital Mobility Observatory ?

J-P. Farandou : The partnership with Netexplo for the Digimobility Observatory is a perfect fit with our digital strategy. It will help us better understand the use of digital technologies in the field of mobility. Most of our passengers already use digital apps to facilitate their mobility, so it was essential for us to be able to rely on a network of experts like those of Netexplo, whose vocation is to observe what is happening in this field everywhere in the world and anticipate these new digital practices. At Keolis we have been studying user behavior for a long time so as to understand their needs and expectations. It's part of our DNA. By joining forces with Netexplo, we've been able to move up to a new level in listening to our users and understanding their needs thanks to digital technologies.

 

What is the goal of this Digital Mobility Observatory ?

J-P. Farandou : The end-purpose of this partnership is to enable us to conceive new services and new mobility solutions that will be proposed to the authorities responsible for organizing transport networks. Local officials are the ones who choose the type of networks and services offered to citizens. In this respect, we share with Netexplo the same conception of a smart city, i.e. a city that serves the people living in it. Whence the importance, once again, of putting the city-dweller at the heart of our reflections to build a new service offering for mobility and retain our lead over the competition.

A crucial space for observation since digital technologies are changing the way we live.

 

Thierry Happe, co- founder and Netexplo CEO

Why is a digital specialist like Netexplo joining forces with a passenger transport group around a Digital Mobility Observatory ?

T. Happe : « The fit between Keolis and Netexplo makes sense since mobility is one of the big avenues for development of digital technologies, which we have been observing for nine years. Keolis has many years of experience in studying city-dwellers' behavior, and we can bring a real boost in the digital field. It is, indeed, very important to understand what is happening. Digital technologies are changing the way we communicate, behave, live and move around. It's a cultural phenomenon that goes way beyond the strictly technological aspect.

 

In the light of your studies, can you tell us what smart cities will look like, particularly in terms of mobility ?

T. Happe : One of our experts, Francis Pisani, has published a book (Voyages dans les villes intelligentes, entre Datapolis et Participolis) based on a survey carried out in 45 cities and some 30 countries. It shows that there are two conceptions of the smart city. One we could call top-down: government or local authorities impose their vision of the city on city-dwellers. The other, which we share with Keolis, consists of providing city-dwellers with the tools and services they need - in the field of mobility, for instance - by observing their behavior. If we put users at the heart of this strategy, the result will be much richer for the life of the community.